MINI MEADOWS: ‘no-mow patches’ are being widely encouraged this spring

Updated: Mar 30



With the prospect of being able to welcome people back into our gardens from tomorrow, the pressure is officially on to get our lawns up to scratch!


In the midst of this mass mowing mission, however, it pays stop and remember the overarching importance of nature’s ‘support and restore’ message that the last year helped bring to the fore.


It would be easy to overlook our gardens as being part of the preservation effort, but as with all things...every little counts.


It’s for this reason, that ‘no-mow patches’ are being widely encouraged this spring, as a token effort towards the kind of ‘wildlife gardening’ that creates places for animals and plants to thrive.


Close-mown lawns offer few opportunities for wildlife, and even just making some simple changes to a small area, can have far-reaching advantages. From attracting more bees and insects into your garden, to creating an attractive ‘mini meadow’ feature that also acts as a talking point (now we know we’ll all be needing those!! #allcoronadout)


According to @plantlife.loveplants’ Trevor Dines ‘the size and shape of your no-mow patch is entirely up to you. ‘If you have a small lawn, try a 1 metre-square micro-meadow’ he says.


As for the upkeep of these little patches of ‘super grass’ -we’ve linked some @guardian top tips here




#saynomow #sunday #nature #longgrass #sunday #garden #minimeadow #wildflowers

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